• News
  • 22 February, 2018

PBT CEO’s ‘Aha’ Moment

With an exciting and successful career spanning more than 25 years across New Zealand, Australia and India, when PBT CEO Kim Tuaine met Michael Moynahan she couldn’t help but want him to be involved in the Hatch Youth Programme supporting young Pacific entrepreneurs to realise their business potential.

Michael Moynahan can well recall meeting Pacific Business Trust CEO Kim Tuaine for the first time last year at a Diversity seminar hosted by Creative New Zealand, which Michael chairs.

“We were on a panel together, then had dinner afterwards where I spoke about the different things I do,” he says.

“Kim then said ‘Ah ha!’ in the sense I was just what she was looking for to get involved in Hatch Youth. And she hasn’t let me go ever since,” he adds, with a smile.

Michael provides a background which includes CEO roles in Australia, New Zealand and India for more than a decade and a half, having run divisions for international media companies after climbing through the corporate ranks in sales and marketing.

With a passion for and highly developed understanding of the role of governance and the value to business of good leadership, Michael is Chair of New Zealand Trade and Enterprises’ NZ Beachhead Advisors.

Beachheads is a network of private sector experts, who provide their time offering perspective and insights to helping clients shape the direction of their business. He also Chairs Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa and TouchTech, and is on the Board of the University Bookshop.

With a career spanning 25 years, Michael has expertise in strategic development and building business capability to deliver growth domestically and internationally.

Managing multiple supply chain and distribution units gives him a practical understanding of businesses large and small, domestic and international, organically and through acquisition.

He has placed a particular emphasis on developing strategic partnership opportunities to leverage greater access and build stronger businesses. He values collaboration and understands the need to build strong relationships with all stakeholders, including staff, suppliers and customers.

When Kim explained the intention behind the Hatch Youth Programme, Michael couldn’t say no.

“You can’t stereotype the Pacific community, or say it’s just this or that. But what you can say is that it’s creative, vibrant and diverse and you know that New Zealand benefits so much from the energy it brings,” he says.

“The Pacifica Arts Awards last year was incredible. What I also like about what the Pacific community brings is that nothing is static. They’re not stuck in the past with notions of how things need to be done.”

Michael also knows, however, such energy and enthusiasm will only take you so far.

“I’ve seen a lot of Pacific business organisations that have great energy and ideas, and you want them to succeed, but they just don’t quite get far enough. If there’s a way I can come alongside them, encourage them to think about it in a particular way as a business, not just an idea or a creation, but a sustainable business, it might help them become sustainable.”

If that does eventuate from just one of the Hatch Youth participants, Michael will know the time and effort has been worthwhile.

“I just want them to succeed from the learnings I and people like me have gained.”